Full List of Macs Compatible With OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard

If you need to run a particular version of one of Apple's Mac operating systems, this tool can let you find all the Macs that can run any version of macOS from OS X 10.0 Cheetah (released 2001), to macOS 12 Monterey (Current).

Select a version of the Mac operating system from the list, and see every Mac model that is compatible with it.

. <- You can enter a specific point release here.

These Macs are all compatible with OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard.

iMacs (Click to Expand)

Click on a Mac below to see more details, and fully compatible upgrades and repairs
  • iMac Early 2009

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 20-Inch (Early 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB417xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2266
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1224
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 24-Inch (Early 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB418xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2267
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1225
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.93GHz 24-Inch (Early 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB419xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2267
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1225
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 24-Inch (Early 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB420xx/A
      • Possible EMC Numbers 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2267, 2134
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1225
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • iMac Mid 2009 (Edu)

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 20-Inch (Mid-2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC015xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2266
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1224
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.26GHz 20-Inch (Mid-2009)
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC015xx/B, MC015xx/C
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2316
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1224
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.8 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • iMac Late 2009 Core 2 Duo

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 21.5-Inch (Late 2009)
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB950xx/A, MC413xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2308
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac10,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1311
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 3.33GHz 21.5-Inch (Late 2009)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2308
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac10,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1311
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 27-Inch (Late 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB952xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2309
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac10,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1312
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 3.33GHz 27-Inch (Late 2009)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2309
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac10,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1312
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • iMac Late 2009 Core i5/i7 27"

    • iMac "Core i5" 2.66GHz 27-Inch (Late 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB953xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2374
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac11,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1312
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      iMac "Core i7" 2.8GHz 27-Inch (Late 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC507xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2374
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac11,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1312
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • iMac Early 2008

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 20-Inch (Early 2008)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB323xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2210
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1224
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 20-Inch (Early 2008)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB324xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2210
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1224
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.8GHz 24-Inch (Early 2008)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB325xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2211
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1225
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 24-Inch (Early 2008)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB398xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2211
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1225
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • iMac Mid 2007

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 20-Inch (Al)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA876xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2133
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac7,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1224
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.10 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 20-Inch (Al)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA877xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2133
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac7,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1224
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.10 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 24-Inch (Al)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA878xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2134
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac7,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1225
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.10 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      iMac "Core 2 Extreme" 2.8GHz 24-Inch (Al)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB322xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2134
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac7,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1225
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.10 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • iMac Early 2006

    • iMac "Core Duo" 1.83GHz 17-Inch
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA199xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2104
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1173
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.4 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
      iMac "Core Duo" 2.0GHz 20-Inch
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA200xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2105
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1174
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.4 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
  • iMac Mid 2006

    • iMac "Core Duo" 1.83GHz 17-Inch (IG)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA406xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2110
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac4,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1195
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
  • iMac Late 2006 CD

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 1.83GHz 17-Inch (IG)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA710xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2124
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1195
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
  • iMac Late 2006

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 17-Inch
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA590xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2114
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1208
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.16GHz 17-Inch
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2114
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1208
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.16GHz 20-Inch
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA589xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2118
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1207
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.33GHz 20-Inch
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2118
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1207
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
  • iMac Late 2006 24"

    • iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.16GHz 24-Inch
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA456xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2111
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac6,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1200
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      iMac "Core 2 Duo" 2.33 24-Inch
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2111
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : iMac6,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1200
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion

Mac minis (Click to Expand)

Click on a Mac below to see more details, and fully compatible upgrades and repairs
  • Mac mini Early/Late 2009

    • Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz (Early 2009)
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB463xx/A, MB464xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2264
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1283
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 2.26GHz (Early 2009)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2264
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1283
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 2.26GHz (Late 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC238xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2336
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1283
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz (Late 2009)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC239xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2336
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1283
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz (Late 2009)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2336
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1283
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
    • Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz (Late 2009 Server)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC408xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2336
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1283
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • Mac mini Mid 2007

    • Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 1.83GHz
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB138xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2108
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1176
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.10 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      Mac mini "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB139xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2108
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1176
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.10 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
  • Mac mini Early/Late 2006

    • Mac mini "Core Solo" 1.5GHz
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA205xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2108
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1176
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.5 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
      Mac mini "Core Duo" 1.66GHz
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA206xx/A, MA607xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2108
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1176
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.5 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
      Mac mini "Core Duo" 1.83GHz
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA608xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2108
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : Macmini1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1176
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard

Mac Pros (Click to Expand)

Click on a Mac below to see more details, and fully compatible upgrades and repairs
  • Mac Pro Early 2009

    • Mac Pro "Quad Core" 2.66GHz (2009/Nehalem)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB871xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2314
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1289
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.14.6 Mojave
        (Requires a firmware upgrade to the MacPro5,1 firmware to get beyond 10.11 El Capitan, and upgrade to a Metal compatible graphics card to get beyond 10.13 High Sierra)
      Mac Pro "Quad Core" 2.93GHz (2009/Nehalem)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2314
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1289
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.14.6 Mojave
        (Requires a firmware upgrade to the MacPro5,1 firmware to get beyond 10.11 El Capitan, and upgrade to a Metal compatible graphics card to get beyond 10.13 High Sierra)
      Mac Pro "Quad Core" 3.33GHz (2009/Nehalem)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2314
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1289
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.14.6 Mojave
        (Requires a firmware upgrade to the MacPro5,1 firmware to get beyond 10.11 El Capitan, and upgrade to a Metal compatible graphics card to get beyond 10.13 High Sierra)
      Mac Pro "Eight Core" 2.26GHz (2009/Nehalem)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB535xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2314
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1289
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.14.6 Mojave
        (Requires a firmware upgrade to the MacPro5,1 firmware to get beyond 10.11 El Capitan, and upgrade to a Metal compatible graphics card to get beyond 10.13 High Sierra)
      Mac Pro "Eight Core" 2.66GHz (2009/Nehalem)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2314
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1289
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.14.6 Mojave
        (Requires a firmware upgrade to the MacPro5,1 firmware to get beyond 10.11 El Capitan, and upgrade to a Metal compatible graphics card to get beyond 10.13 High Sierra)
      Mac Pro "Eight Core" 2.93GHz (2009/Nehalem)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2314
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1289
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.14.6 Mojave
        (Requires a firmware upgrade to the MacPro5,1 firmware to get beyond 10.11 El Capitan, and upgrade to a Metal compatible graphics card to get beyond 10.13 High Sierra)
  • Mac Pro Early 2008

    • Mac Pro "Quad Core" 2.8GHz (2008)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2180
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.1 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      Mac Pro "Eight Core" 2.8GHz (2008)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA970xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2180
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.1 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      Mac Pro "Eight Core" 3.0GHz (2008)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2180
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.1 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      Mac Pro "Eight Core" 3.2GHz (2008)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB451xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2180
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.1 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • Mac Pro 2007

    • Mac Pro "Eight Core" 3.0GHz (2,1)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2138
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
  • Mac Pro 2006

    • Mac Pro "Quad Core" 2.0GHz (Original)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2113
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      Mac Pro "Quad Core" 2.66GHz (Original)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA356xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2113
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      Mac Pro "Quad Core" 3.0GHz (Original)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2113
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacPro1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1186
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.7 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion

MacBooks (Click to Expand)

Click on a Mac below to see more details, and fully compatible upgrades and repairs
  • MacBook Early/Mid 2009

    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (White-09)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB881xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2300
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.13GHz 13" (White-09)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC240xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2300
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Late 2009

    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.26GHz 13" (Uni/Late 09)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC207xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2350
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook6,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1342
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.1 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • MacBook Early 2008

    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.1GHz 13" (White-08)
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB402xx/A, MB402xx/B
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2242
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 13" (White-08)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB403xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2242
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 13" (Black-08)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB404xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2242
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
  • MacBook Late 2008 Aluminium

    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (Unibody/Aluminium)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB466xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2254
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 13" (Unibody/Aluminium)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB467xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2254
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Mid 2007

    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (White/07)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB061xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2139
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.16GHz 13" (White)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB062xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2139
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.16GHz 13" (Black)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB063xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2139
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
  • MacBook Late 2007

    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (White-SR)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB061xx/B
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2200
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.2GHz 13" (White-SR)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB062xx/B
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2200
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.2GHz 13" (Black-SR)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB063xx/B
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2200
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
  • MacBook

    • MacBook "Core Duo" 1.83GHz 13"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA254xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2092
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.6 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
      MacBook "Core Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (White)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA255xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2092
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.6 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
    • MacBook "Core Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (Black)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA472xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2092
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.6 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
  • MacBook Late 2006

    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 1.83GHz 13"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA699xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2121
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.8 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (White/06)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA700xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2121
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.8 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
    • MacBook "Core 2 Duo" 2.0GHz 13" (Black)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA701xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2121
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBook2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1181
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.8 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion

MacBook Airs (Click to Expand)

Click on a Mac below to see more details, and fully compatible upgrades and repairs
  • MacBook Air Late 2008/Mid 2009

    • MacBook Air "Core 2 Duo" 1.86GHz 13" (Mid-09)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC233xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2334
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookAir2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1304
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Air "Core 2 Duo" 2.13GHz 13" (Mid-09)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC234xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2334
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookAir2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1304
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Air "Core 2 Duo" 1.6GHz 13" (NVIDIA)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB543xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2253
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookAir2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1304
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Air "Core 2 Duo" 1.86GHz 13" (NVIDIA)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB940xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2253
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookAir2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1304
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Air - Original

    • MacBook Air "Core 2 Duo" 1.6GHz 13" (Original)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB003xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2142
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookAir1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1237
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.1 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      MacBook Air "Core 2 Duo" 1.8GHz 13" (Original)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2142
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookAir1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1237
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.1 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion

MacBook Pros (Click to Expand)

Click on a Mac below to see more details, and fully compatible upgrades and repairs
  • MacBook Pro Early/Mid 2009 17"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 17" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB604xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2272
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.93GHz 17" (Unibody)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2272
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.8GHz 17" (Mid-2009)
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC226xx/A, MC227xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2329
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 17" (Mid-2009)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2329
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Pro Late 2008/Early 2009 15"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC026xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.93GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB470xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB471xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.8GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Pro Mid 2009 13"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.26GHz 13" (SD/FW)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB990xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2326
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,5
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz 13" (SD/FW)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB991LL-A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2326
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,5
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Pro Mid 2009 15"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz 15" (SD)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC118xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2324
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,4
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 15" (SD)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB985xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2325
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.8GHz 15" (SD)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB986xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2325
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 15" (SD)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2325
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Pro Early 2008

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 15" (08)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB133xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2198
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1260
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.5GHz 15" (08)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB134xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2198
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1260
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.6GHz 15" (08)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2198
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1260
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.5GHz 17" (08)
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB166xx/A, MB766xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2199
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1261
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.6GHz 17" (08)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2199
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro4,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1261
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.2 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Pro Mid/Late 2007

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.2GHz 15" (SR)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA895xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2136
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1226
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 15" (SR)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA896xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2136
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1226
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.6GHz 15" (SR)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2136
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1226
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 17" (SR)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA897xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2137
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1229
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.6GHz 17" (SR)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2137
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro3,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1229
      • Launched: 2007
      • Discontinued: 2008
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.9 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Pro 15"

    • MacBook Pro "Core Duo" 1.67GHz 15"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA090xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2101
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1150
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.5 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
      MacBook Pro "Core Duo" 1.83GHz 15"
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA091xx, MA463xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2101
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1150
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.5 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
      MacBook Pro "Core Duo" 2.0GHz 15"
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA464xx/A, MA600xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2101
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1150
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.5 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
      MacBook Pro "Core Duo" 2.16GHz 15"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA601xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2101
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro1,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1150
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.5 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
  • MacBook Pro 17"

    • MacBook Pro "Core Duo" 2.16GHz 17"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA092xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2102
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro1,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1151
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2006
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.6 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.6.8 Snow Leopard
  • MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo/Late 2006

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.16GHz 15"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA609xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2120
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro2,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1211
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.8 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.33GHz 15"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA610xx
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2120
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro2,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1211
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.8 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion
    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.33GHz 17"
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MA611xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2119
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro2,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1212
      • Launched: 2006
      • Discontinued: 2007
      • Min OS: OS X 10.4.8 Tiger
      • Max OS: OS X 10.7.5 Lion

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