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MacBook Pro Unibody - Upgrade & Repair

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MacBook Pro Unibody

The MacBook Pro Unibody, released in late 2008, was where the MacBook Pro range really hit its stride. Featuring faster drive controllers, and the ability to run more and faster RAM, these machines were excellent when they came out, and the ability to upgrade to 8GB or 16GB using cheap DDR3 RAM, and run an SSD at useful speed, has prolonged the useful life of many of these machines well into their second decade.

These Macs were released in 13", 15" and 17" configurations. The 13" models are generally of a bit lower spec and have integrated graphics cards while the 15" and 17" models are similar apart from the screen size and have dedicated graphics cards. Maximum RAM is 16GB on the 2011 and later models (and, strangely, the 13" 2010), and 8GB on others (the 15" Late 2008/Early 2009 models have a firmware requirement but this is normally met in all machines that have been upgraded to at least OS X 10.7 Lion). Drive controllers are SATA 600 on the 2011 and later, and SATA 300 on earlier models.

The 2009 models can run up to OSX 10.11 El Capitan, 2010 and 2011 models up to macOS 10.13 High Sierra, and 2012 and later macOS 10.15 Catalina.

We have a full range of upgrades available for these machines and provide fitting services if required. Despite their age, they can be upgraded easily and cheaply to a useful amount of RAM and a fast SSD, making them surprisingly capable machines for lighter tasks.

We have extensive experience in repairing all MacBook Pro Unibodies. We can replace drives, RAM, screens, internal and case components, as well as having a great deal of experience with component level logic board repair and offer discounted services for some of the known logic board issues suffered by some models, for example a permanent graphics card bypass for 2011 15" and 17" models, and replacement of the frequently faulty C9560 capacitor on the 2010 15".

Click on a Mac below to see more details, and fully compatible upgrades and repairs

You can also find your Mac by searching for it:

MacBook Pro Unibody with 13" Display

  • MacBook Pro Mid 2012 13"

    • MacBook Pro Core i5 2.5GHz 13" Mid-2012/Early 2013
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD101xx/A, MD509xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2554
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro9,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2012
      • Discontinued: 2016
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.3 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.15.7 Catalina
      MacBook Pro Core i7 2.9GHz 13" Mid-2012/Early 2013
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD102xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2554
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro9,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2012
      • Discontinued: 2016
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.3 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.15.7 Catalina
  • MacBook Pro Early/Late 2011 13"

    • MacBook Pro Core i5 2.4GHz 13" Late 2011
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD311xx/A, MD313xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2555
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2012
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.2 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro Core i7 2.8GHz 13" Late 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD314xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2555
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2012
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.2 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i5" 2.3GHz 13" Early 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC700xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2419
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.7GHz 13" Early 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC724xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2419
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • MacBook Pro Mid 2010 13"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 13" Mid-2010
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC374xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2351
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro7,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 13" Mid-2010
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC375xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2351
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro7,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • MacBook Pro Mid 2009 13"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.26GHz 13" (SD/FW)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB990xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2326
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,5
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz 13" (SD/FW)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB991LL-A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2326
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,5
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1278
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan

MacBook Pro Unibody with 15" Display

  • MacBook Pro Mid 2012 15"

    • MacBook Pro Core i7 2.3GHz 15" Mid-2012
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD103xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2556
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2012
      • Discontinued: 2013
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.3 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.15.7 Catalina
      MacBook Pro Core i7 2.6GHz 15" Mid-2012
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD104xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2556
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2012
      • Discontinued: 2013
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.3 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.15.7 Catalina
      MacBook Pro Core i7 2.7GHz 15" Mid-2012
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD546xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2556
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro9,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2012
      • Discontinued: 2013
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.3 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.15.7 Catalina
  • MacBook Pro Early/Late 2011 15"

    • MacBook Pro Core i7 2.2GHz 15" Late 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD318xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2563
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2012
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.2 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro Core i7 2.4GHz 15" Late 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD322xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2563
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2012
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.2 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro Core i7 2.5GHz 15" Late 2011
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2563
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2012
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.2 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.0GHz 15" Early 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC721xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2353-1
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.2GHz 15" Early 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC723xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2353-1
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.3GHz 15" Early 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD035xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2353-1
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • MacBook Pro Mid 2010 15"

    • MacBook Pro "Core i5" 2.4GHz 15" Mid-2010
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC371xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2353
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro6,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i5" 2.53GHz 15" Mid-2010
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC372xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2353
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro6,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.66GHz 15" Mid-2010
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC373xx/A, MC666xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2353
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro6,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.8GHz 15" Mid-2010
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC847xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2353
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro6,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • MacBook Pro Mid 2009 15"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz 15" (SD)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC118xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2324
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,4
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 15" (SD)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB985xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2325
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.8GHz 15" (SD)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB986xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2325
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 15" (SD)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2325
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
  • MacBook Pro Late 2008/Early 2009 15"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC026xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.93GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.4GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB470xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB471xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.8GHz 15" (Unibody)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2255
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1286
      • Launched: 2008
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.5 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan

MacBook Pro Unibody with 17" Display

  • MacBook Pro Early/Late 2011 17"

    • MacBook Pro Core i7 2.4GHz 17" Late 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MD311LL/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2564
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2012
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.2 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro Core i7 2.5GHz 17" Late 2011
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2564
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2012
      • Min OS: OS X 10.7.2 Lion
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.2GHz 17" Early 2011
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC725xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2352-1
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.3GHz 17" Early 2011
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2352-1
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro8,3
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2011
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.6 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • MacBook Pro Mid 2010 17"

    • MacBook Pro "Core i5" 2.53GHz 17" Mid-2010
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC024xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2352
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro6,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.66GHz 17" Mid-2010
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2352
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro6,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
      MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.8GHz 17" Mid-2010
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC846xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2352
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro6,1
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2010
      • Discontinued: 2011
      • Min OS: OS X 10.6.3 Snow Leopard
      • Max OS: macOS 10.13.6 High Sierra
  • MacBook Pro Early/Mid 2009 17"

    • MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.8GHz 17" (Mid-2009)
      • Part Numbers 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MC226xx/A, MC227xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2329
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 3.06GHz 17" (Mid-2009)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2329
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2010
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.7 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.66GHz 17" (Unibody)
      • Part Number 

        The MPN (Marketing Part Number), also sometimes called the model number, marketing number, order number or part number. This is the part number under which Apple sold this particular Mac model. Only base configurations have part numbers, while Macs sold with various build to order/configure to order options do not have them. What we consider a single Mac may have multiple part numbers, which may refer to different specifications of RAM, drive size, or case colour that were offered as base options. Part numbers also differ by country or region.

        In modern Macs it is usually an 8 or 9 digit code, with the last 2 characters being "/A" or occasionally "/B". The one or two characters immediately before the "/" depend on country or region - "B" is the UK, "LL" the USA, etc. We represent this portion as "xx".

        : MB604xx/A
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2272
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan
      MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.93GHz 17" (Unibody)
      • EMC Number 

        EMC numbers cover a narrow group of Macs, or sometimes an individual machine. There are exceptions, but usually models that share an EMC number were released at the same time, and share all attributes apart from minor differences in CPU and other internal components. In a very few cases, Macs of the same model were sold with multiple different EMC numbers.

        The EMC number is usually a 4 digit numerical code, though in a few cases there are additional characters.

        : 2272
      • Model Identifier 

        Model Identifiers often cover a narrow range of Macs. Usually one particular type of Mac, with a specific screen size, released at a particular time. Though in some cases a later revision that is substantially similar, will carry the same Model ID.

        Staring with the Intel Macs released in 2006, Model IDs were in the format MacNameX,Y where MacName is a recognisable Mac model (iMac, MacBookPro etc.), and the X and Y are numbers.

        However in 2022, a couple of years after the ARM switchover, Apple started using the format MacX,Y - the X and Y are numbers, but the "Mac" is the same across different models.

        Old pre-Intel (PowerPC) Macs were almost all PowerMacX,Y or PowerBookX,Y (the exception being the very first iMac, which is: "iMac,1").

        : MacBookPro5,2
      • Model Number 

        Model numbers, also sometimes called family numbers, are an identifier that often cover a fairly wide range of Macs. In cases where the fundamental design of a Mac has remained mostly unchanged, but incremental upgrades have been made to internal components, a single Model Number can cover more than 20 individual Macs, released over several years. Other Model Numbers are unique to a single machine.

        It is usually a 5 character code in the format AXXXX, where the Xs are numerals. Some very old Macs have a Model Number that starts with an "M" rather than "A".

        : A1297
      • Launched: 2009
      • Discontinued: 2009
      • Min OS: OS X 10.5.6 Leopard
      • Max OS: OS X 10.11.6 El Capitan